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525,000 covers uploaded!


The 525,000th cover cover was uploaded in April to the GCD!

Check out the cover which is from the issue Aventura #491 from Mexican publisher Editorial Novaro.


Grand GCD Gathering during the Baltimore Comic-Con in September

Make your plans now to attend the Grand GCD Gathering during the Baltimore Comic-Con on September 25-27, 2015 at the Baltimore Convention Center in Downtown Baltimore, Maryland. This will be an historic meeting, where more of us will meet face-to-face than ever before. Come by and visit our booth we will have at the show! More Information to come!


GCD Comics Timeline


25 Years Ago This Month: Caliber Press's Buried Treasure #2 (http://www.comics.org/issue/576716/) reprints Joe Orlando and Wally Wood's cover to Captain Science #4 (http://www.comics.org/issue/8981/#82100) from June 1951!

Buried Treasure in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/series/34414/covers/

Captain Science in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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25 Years Ago This Month: Caliber Press's Buried Treasure #2 (http://www.comics.org/issue/576716/) reprints Joe Orlando and Wally Wood's cover to Captain Science #4 (http://www.comics.org/issue/8981/#82100) from June 1951!

Buried Treasure in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/series/34414/covers/

Captain Science in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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50 Years Ago This Month: Western Publishing issues The Man from U.N.C.L.E. #1 (http://www.comics.org/issue/68557/) under their Gold Key Comics imprint with a photo cover of Robert Vaughn as Napoleon Solo!

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is an American television series broadcast on NBC from September 22, 1964, to January 15, 1968. It follows secret agents, played by Robert Vaughn and David McCallum, who work for a secret international espionage and law-enforcement agency called U.N.C.L.E., an acronym for the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement.

Several comic strips based on the series were published. In the US, there was a Gold Key Comics comic book series (one based on the show), which ran for twenty-two issues. Entertainment Publishing released an eleven issue series of one- and two-part stories from January 1987 to September 1988 that updated U.N.C.L.E. to the Eighties. A two-part comics story, "The Birds of Prey Affair," was put out by Millennium Publications in 1993, which showcased the return of a smaller, much more streamlined version of T.H.R.U.S.H., controlled by Dr. Egret, who had melded with the Ultimate Computer. The script was written by Mark Ellis and Terry Collins with artwork by Nick Choles, and transplanted the characters into the present day.

Two Man from U.N.C.L.E. strips originated for the British market in the 1960s (some Gold Key material was also reprinted), the most notable the Lady Penelope comic, which launched in January 1966. This was replaced by a Girl from U.N.C.L.E. strip in January 1967. Man from U.N.C.L.E. also featured in the short-lived title Solo (published between February and September 1967) and some text stories appeared in TV Tornado.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man_from_U.N.C.L.E.

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me....


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75 Years Ago This Month: Captain Marvel crashes through in the pages of Whiz Comics #4 (http://www.comics.org/issue/775/), cover by C.C. Beck!

Whiz Comics in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/series/189/covers/


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David Michelinie (born May 6, 1948) is an American comic book writer best known for his run scripting Marvel Comics' The Amazing Spider-Man and Iron Man and the DC Comics feature "Superman" in Action Comics.

Among Michelinie's best-known work are his two runs on Iron Man with co-plotter (and inker) Bob Layton, in the late 1970s and early 1980s which introduced the character's serious problem with alcoholism and his specialized power armor variants. He introduced two of Stark's closest comrades, Bethany Cabe and Jim Rhodes as well as new enmities with Justin Hammer and Doctor Doom. After leaving the title in 1981, Michelinie reunited with Layton on the book late in 1986, and along with penciller M. D. Bright, closed out preceding writer Dennis O'Neil's Advanced Idea Mechanics arc and launched the Armor Wars. Michelinie left Iron Man again after issue #250, closing his second collaboration with Layton with a sequel to their Iron Man-Doctor Doom time travel episode from issues #149-150.

Michelinie was one of writers of The Avengers from 1978 to 1982 and worked with artists John Byrne and George Pérez. Michelinie and Pérez created the Taskmaster in The Avengers #195 (May 1980).

From 1987 to 1994, Michelinie wrote the The Amazing Spider-Man series which featured the art of Todd McFarlane, Erik Larsen, and Mark Bagley, while introducing the supervillains Venom in issue #298 (March 1988) and Carnage in #361 (April 1992).

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Michelinie

David Michelinie in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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Arthur Floyd Gottfredson (May 5, 1905 – July 22, 1986) was an American cartoonist best known for his defining work on the Mickey Mouse comic strip. He has probably had the same impact on the Mickey Mouse comics as Carl Barks had on the Donald Duck comics. Two decades after his death, his memory was honored with the Disney Legends citation in 2003 and induction into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2006.

Walt Disney Productions hired Gottfredson as an apprentice animator and in-betweener on December 19, 1929. In April 1930 he started working on the four-month-old Mickey Mouse comic strip. It had originally been scripted by Walt Disney and drawn by Ub Iwerks who was succeeded by Win Smith. In May, Disney had Gottfredson assigned to the daily strip, promising it would be only a temporary arrangement until someone else could be found to take over. As it turned out, Gottfredson continued to produce the Mickey Mouse strips for the next 45 years.

Gottfredson's first daily strip was published in newspapers on his 25th birthday, May 5, 1930. On January 17, 1932 he began work on the newly inaugurated Mickey Mouse color Sunday strip which, in addition to the daily, he continued through mid-1938.

From the beginning, the strips were parts of long continuing stories. These introduced characters such as Eli Squinch; Mickey's nephews, Morty and Ferdie Fieldmouse; Detective Casey, Chief O'Hara and the Phantom Blot. The stories were always untitled. Titles were usually assigned later, when the strips or pages were reprinted in picture-books or comic books.

Gottfredson continued illustrating the daily strip until he retired on October 1, 1975. His last one was published on November 15 and his last Sunday strip on September 19, 1976.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floyd_Gottfredson

Floyd Gottfredson in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Michel Régnier (5 May 1931 – 29 October 1999), best known by his pseudonym Greg, was a Belgian cartoonist best known for Achille Talon, and later became editor of Tintin magazine.

The series for which Greg is best known, Achille Talon, began in 1963 in Pilote magazine, also the source of comics such as Asterix. This series, which he both wrote and illustrated, presents the comic misadventures of the eponymous mild-mannered polysyllabic bourgeois. In all 42 albums appeared, the first years with short gags, later with full-length (i.e. 44 pages) stories. The series was continued by Widenlocher after Greg's death. An English translation titled Walter Melon was unsuccessful. In 1996, an animated series of 52 episodes of 26 minutes each was produced. This series was also shown in English as Walter Melon. Other series Greg provided artwork for in the early 60s were the boxing series Rock Derby and the revival of Alain Saint-Ogan's classic series Zig et Puce.

Regnier became editor-in-chief of Tintin magazine in 1966 and remained so until 1974. In this period, he moved the magazine away from the classic Ligne claire of Hergé and Edgar Pierre Jacobs, because the main authors published new stories less frequently, and because the magazine suffered from the success of new French magazines like Pilote. Greg introduced a more adult genre, with less perfect heroes and more violence. He created some of his most famous series like Bruno Brazil and Bernard Prince in this period, and introduced artists like Hermann to the magazine.

In 1975 he became literary director for the French publisher Dargaud and launched Achille Talon magazine.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greg_(cartoonist)

Michel Regnier in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Stan Goldberg (May 5, 1932 – August 31, 2014) was an American comic book artist, best known for his work with Archie Comics and as a Marvel Comics colorist who in the 1960s helped design the original color schemes of Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four and other major characters. He was inducted into the National Cartoonists Society Hall of Fame in 2011.

In 1949, Goldberg began work in the comics field as a staff colorist for Marvel's 1940s predecessor, Timely Comics, working under Jon D'Agostino. Two years later, Goldberg became the coloring-department manager. In that capacity, he said, he "colored not just interiors, but also every cover the rest of the decade" for Timely's successor, Atlas Comics. Additionally, Goldberg drew stories for Atlas' horror comics (including as early as "The Cave of Death" in Marvel Tales #109, Oct. 1952) and other titles.

As Atlas segued into Marvel, Goldberg began freelance-coloring the company's comic books through the mid-1960s, working with such artists as Steve Ditko and Jack Kirby to create the color designs for such characters as Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, the Hulk and others during what historians call the Silver Age of comic books.

Goldberg stopped freelancing for Marvel in 1969, and for three years drew the DC Comics teen titles Date with Debbie, Swing with Scooter and Binky. Shortly afterward he began a decades-long association with Archie Comics, joining Dan DeCarlo, Henry Scarpelli and other artists in drawing the house-style misadventures of Archie, Betty, Veronica, Jughead, Reggie and the rest of the Riverdale High teens.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Goldberg

Stan Goldberg in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the story V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore.

Lloyd started working in comics in the late 1970s, drawing for Halls of Horror, TV Comic and a number of Marvel UK titles. With writer Steve Parkhouse, he created the pulp adventure character Night Raven.

Dez Skinn set up Warrior magazine in 1982; he asked Lloyd to create a new pulp character. Lloyd and writer Alan Moore (who had previously collaborated on several Doctor Who stories at Marvel UK) created V for Vendetta, a dystopian adventure featuring a flamboyant anarchist terrorist fighting against a future fascist government. Lloyd, who illustrated in cinematic chiaroscuro, devised V's Guy Fawkes-inspired appearance and suggested that Moore avoid captions, sound effects and thought balloons. After Warrior folded in 1984, the series was reprinted and continued in colour by DC Comics and collected as a graphic novel in 1995. It was adapted into a film released in 2006. The stylized Guy Fawkes mask that Lloyd created for V for Vendetta has transcended the story and made its way into the real world, frequently being used by protesters demonstrating against the perceived injustices of governments, cults, financial institutions and other powerful organizations.

Lloyd has also worked on Espers, with writer James D. Hudnall, for Eclipse Comics; Hellblazer, with writers Grant Morrison and Jamie Delano, and War Story, with Garth Ennis, for DC; and Global Frequency, with Warren Ellis, for Wildstorm. With Delano he also drew The Territory for Dark Horse, where he has also worked on some of their licensed properties like Aliens and James Bond.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Lloyd_(comics)

David Lloyd in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Alé Garza (born Alejandro Garza on May 4, 1977) is a penciler and comics artist. At the age of 18, he started working for Wildstorm, and quickly moved on to working with writers like Chris Claremont and Judd Winick, lending his art to titles like Gen¹³, Zero, E.V.E. Protomecha, Batgirl and Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day. Aside from DC, Garza has worked on Marvel Comics's Marvel Knights Spider-Man and Top Cow's Witchblade.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alé_Garza

Alé Garza in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Disclaimer
The Grand Comics Database Project (GCD) is a volunteer project with the goal of documenting and indexing all comics for the free use of scholars, historians, researchers, and fans.
The GCD acknowledges that the all-encompassing research nature of the project may result in the posting of cover scans for comics with images that some may find objectionable.
Viewer discretion is advised.
The Grand Comics Database Team
Statistics
8,321 publishers
5,582 brands
4,390 indicia publishers
84,933 series
1,085,494 issues
42,440 variant issues
218,077 issue indexes
528,275 covers
1,451,280 stories