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550,000 uploaded covers!

The 550,000th cover was contributed to our database!

Check out the issue The Hornet #589 from D.C. Thomson, published December 1974.

GCD Comics Timeline

50 Years Ago this month:

Sinbad's vessel vanishes from a remote sea and his crew become the enslaved victims of Indra in the first issue (of two) of Western's Fantastic Voyages of Sinbad!


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George Pratt (b. October 13, 1960, in Beaumont, Texas) is an American painter and illustrator known for his work in the comic book field.

Pratt's first published comics work was for Marvel Comics' Epic Illustrated #20 (1983). Since then, his work has appeared in Heavy Metal, Eagle, and many other publications. He has also inked other artists' work and created painted covers for DC Comics.

In 1990, DC published Pratt's first graphic novel, Enemy Ace: War Idyll, which was nominated for both the Eisner Award and the Harvey Award. Enemy Ace: War Idyll has been translated into nine languages and at one point was on the required reading list at West Point. The book won the France Info Award for Best Foreign Language Graphic Novel, and the British Speakeasy Award for Best Foreign Language Graphic Novel.

Pratt's painted graphic novel Batman: Harvest Breed (DC) was nominated for two Eisner Awards.

The Wolverine: Netsuke limited series for Marvel won Pratt the 2003 Eisner Award for Best Painter/Multimedia Artist.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Pratt_(artist)

Pratt in the Grand Comics Database: http://www.comics.org/credit/name/george%20pratt/sort/chrono/

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25 Years Ago this month:

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Dan Abnett (born 12 October 1965) is a British comic book writer and novelist. He has been a frequent collaborator with fellow writer Andy Lanning, and is known for his work on books for both Marvel Comics, and their UK imprint, Marvel UK, since the 1990s, and also 2000 AD. He has also contributed to DC Comics titles, and his Warhammer Fantasy and Warhammer 40,000 novels and graphic novels for Games Workshop's Black Library now run to several dozen titles and have sold over 1,150,000 copies as of May 2008.

As one of the more prolific 2000 AD writers, Abnett was responsible for the creation of one of the comic's better known, and longest-running, strips of the last decade, Sinister Dexter. Other original stories include Black Light, Badlands, Atavar, Downlode Tales, Sancho Panzer, Roadkill and Wardog, based on the game of the same name. Abnett has also contributed to some of the comic's major ongoing series, including Judge Dredd, Durham Red and Rogue Trooper.

His work for Marvel includes runs on Death's Head 2, Battletide, Knights of Pendragon (all of which he co-created), The Punisher, War Machine, Annihilation: Nova and various X-Men titles, as well as several stories for the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip.

At DC he is probably best known for his 2000 relaunch of Legion of Super-Heroes as the limited series Legion Lost and then the ongoing series The Legion. His work for DC is usually co-written with Andy Lanning and they are often referred to as DnA. The two co-created the Resurrection Man character with artist Jackson Guice in 1997.

For Dark Horse Comics he co-wrote Planet of the Apes: Blood Lines with Ian Edginton, as well a penning Lords of Misrule and HyperSonic.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dan_Abnett

Dan Abnett in the Grand Comics Database:

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Serge Clerc (born 12 October 1957 in Roanne, Loire) is a French comic book artist and illustrator. Serge Clerc began his professional career in 1975 in the monthly magazine Métal Hurlant, after having created his own fanzine, Absolutely Live. Initially a science-fiction artist, his story Captain Futur appeared in book form in 1979 by Les Humanoïdes Associés.

In the early 1980s Clerc's work regularly appeared in the British music magazines NME and Melody Maker. For the magazine Rock and Folk, he created the detective Phil Perfect and his alter-ego Sam Bronx, a series that was also printed in Métal Hurlant and in books by Les Humanoïdes Associés.

His retro themed work has been used on music albums by Carmel (The Drum is Everything) and Joe Jackson (Big World) as well as a number of other albums and singles.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serge_Clerc

Serge Clerc in the Grand Comics Database:

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Pat Brady (born October 12, 1947 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American cartoonist and creator of the comic strip Rose Is Rose, syndicated by United Feature Syndicate since 1983.

Brady started cartooning at the age of five, drawing cartoons during Roman Catholic mass. He was nicknamed "Pasquale" by the priest. Brady graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1969. He won the Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year for 2004.

Prior to Rose Is Rose, Brady created a comic strip named Dreamer, but it was rejected by every publisher who saw it. Brady created "Graves, Inc." which was syndicated briefly by the Register and Tribune Syndicate in the early '80s.
Brady was described by Pearls Before Swine cartoonist Stephan Pastis as "the nicest guy in cartooning".

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pat_Brady_%28cartoonist%29

Rose Is Rose in the Grand Comics Database:

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Three thousand followers! What a great way to start a Monday! The GCD thanks you all for your support and hopes you continue to find enjoyment and information from our work.

Many thanks to artist Brian Bolland for this beautiful cover.

Camelot 3000 in the Grand Comics Database:

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Arthur "Art" Clokey (October 12, 1921 – January 8, 2010) was an American pioneer in the popularization of stop motion clay animation, best known as the creator of the character Gumby. Clokey's career began in 1955 with a film experiment called Gumbasia, which was influenced by his professor, Slavko Vorkapich, at the University of Southern California. Clokey and his wife Ruth subsequently came up with the clay character Gumby and his horse Pokey, who first appeared in the Howdy Doody Show, and later got their own series The Adventures of Gumby, with which they became a familiar presence on American television.

Art Clokey made a few highly experimental and visually inventive short clay animation films for adults, including his first student film Gumbasia (produced in 1953 and released in 1955), the visually rich Mandala (1977) — described by Clokey as a metaphor for evolving human consciousness — and the equally bizarre The Clay Peacock (1963), an elaboration on the animated NBC logo of the time. Consisting of animated clay shapes contorting to a jazz score, Gumbasia so intrigued Samuel G. Engel, then president of the Motion Pictures Producers Association, that he financed the pilot film for what became Clokey's The Gumby Show (1957). The title Gumbasia was in homage to Walt Disney's Fantasia.

In 1987, Clokey provided the voice for the figure Pokey in Arnold Leibovit's film The Puppetoon Movie.

Clokey is credited with the clay-animation title sequences for the 1965 beach movies Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine and How to Stuff a Wild Bikini. His son, Joe Clokey, continued the Davey and Goliath cartoon in 2004. In March 2007, KQED-TV broadcast the hour-long documentary Gumby Dharma as part of their Truly CA series.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Clokey

Gumby in the Grand Comics Database:

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Lester Dent (October 12, 1904 – March 11, 1959) was an American pulp-fiction author, best known as the creator and main author of the series of novels about the superhuman scientist and adventurer, Doc Savage. The 159 novels written over 16 years were credited to the house name Kenneth Robeson.

In 1932, Henry Ralston of Street and Smith Publications contacted Dent with a proposition for a new magazine. Ralston had scored a great success with The Shadow magazine, and was interested in developing a second title around a central character. He had in mind an adventure hero, which appealed to Dent's love of that genre. While Dent was unhappy to discover that his stories would be published under a house name, he was happy to receive $500 per novel, and accepted Ralston's offer.

Issue 1 of Doc Savage magazine hit the stands in February 1933; within six months it was one of the top selling pulp magazines on the market. Much of the success stemmed from Dent's fantastic imagination, fueled by his own personal curiosity. Dent was able to use the freedom that his new-found financial security allowed him to learn and to explore. In addition to being a wide-ranging reader, Dent also took courses in technology and the trades. He earned both his amateur radio and pilot license, passed both the electricians' and plumbers' trade exams, and was an avid mountain climber. His usual method was to learn a subject thoroughly, then move on to another. An example is boating: in the late 1930s, Dent bought a 40-foot two-masted schooner. He and his wife lived on it for several years, sailing it up and down the eastern coast of the US. The Dents traveled extensively as well, enough to earn Lester a membership in the Explorers Club.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lester_Dent

Doc Savage in the Grand Comics Database:

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50 Years Ago This Month: Whatever you do, wherever you go, "Never Step on a Scorpion!" It's The Amazing Spider-Man #29 (http://www.comics.org/issue/19533/), cover by Steve Ditko!

The Amazing Spider-Man in the Grand Comics Database:

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The Grand Comics Database Project (GCD) is a volunteer project with the goal of documenting and indexing all comics for the free use of scholars, historians, researchers, and fans.
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