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525,000 covers uploaded!


The 525,000th cover cover was uploaded in April to the GCD!

Check out the cover which is from the issue Aventura #491 from Mexican publisher Editorial Novaro.


Grand GCD Gathering during the Baltimore Comic-Con in September

Make your plans now to attend the Grand GCD Gathering during the Baltimore Comic-Con on September 25-27, 2015 at the Baltimore Convention Center in Downtown Baltimore, Maryland. This will be an historic meeting, where more of us will meet face-to-face than ever before. Come by and visit our booth we will have at the show! More Information to come!


GCD Comics Timeline


Stan Goldberg (May 5, 1932 – August 31, 2014) was an American comic book artist, best known for his work with Archie Comics and as a Marvel Comics colorist who in the 1960s helped design the original color schemes of Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four and other major characters. He was inducted into the National Cartoonists Society Hall of Fame in 2011.

In 1949, Goldberg began work in the comics field as a staff colorist for Marvel's 1940s predecessor, Timely Comics, working under Jon D'Agostino. Two years later, Goldberg became the coloring-department manager. In that capacity, he said, he "colored not just interiors, but also every cover the rest of the decade" for Timely's successor, Atlas Comics. Additionally, Goldberg drew stories for Atlas' horror comics (including as early as "The Cave of Death" in Marvel Tales #109, Oct. 1952) and other titles.

As Atlas segued into Marvel, Goldberg began freelance-coloring the company's comic books through the mid-1960s, working with such artists as Steve Ditko and Jack Kirby to create the color designs for such characters as Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, the Hulk and others during what historians call the Silver Age of comic books.

Goldberg stopped freelancing for Marvel in 1969, and for three years drew the DC Comics teen titles Date with Debbie, Swing with Scooter and Binky. Shortly afterward he began a decades-long association with Archie Comics, joining Dan DeCarlo, Henry Scarpelli and other artists in drawing the house-style misadventures of Archie, Betty, Veronica, Jughead, Reggie and the rest of the Riverdale High teens.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stan_Goldberg

Stan Goldberg in the Grand Comics Database:
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David Lloyd (born 1950) is a British comics artist best known as the illustrator of the story V for Vendetta, written by Alan Moore.

Lloyd started working in comics in the late 1970s, drawing for Halls of Horror, TV Comic and a number of Marvel UK titles. With writer Steve Parkhouse, he created the pulp adventure character Night Raven.

Dez Skinn set up Warrior magazine in 1982; he asked Lloyd to create a new pulp character. Lloyd and writer Alan Moore (who had previously collaborated on several Doctor Who stories at Marvel UK) created V for Vendetta, a dystopian adventure featuring a flamboyant anarchist terrorist fighting against a future fascist government. Lloyd, who illustrated in cinematic chiaroscuro, devised V's Guy Fawkes-inspired appearance and suggested that Moore avoid captions, sound effects and thought balloons. After Warrior folded in 1984, the series was reprinted and continued in colour by DC Comics and collected as a graphic novel in 1995. It was adapted into a film released in 2006. The stylized Guy Fawkes mask that Lloyd created for V for Vendetta has transcended the story and made its way into the real world, frequently being used by protesters demonstrating against the perceived injustices of governments, cults, financial institutions and other powerful organizations.

Lloyd has also worked on Espers, with writer James D. Hudnall, for Eclipse Comics; Hellblazer, with writers Grant Morrison and Jamie Delano, and War Story, with Garth Ennis, for DC; and Global Frequency, with Warren Ellis, for Wildstorm. With Delano he also drew The Territory for Dark Horse, where he has also worked on some of their licensed properties like Aliens and James Bond.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Lloyd_(comics)

David Lloyd in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Alé Garza (born Alejandro Garza on May 4, 1977) is a penciler and comics artist. At the age of 18, he started working for Wildstorm, and quickly moved on to working with writers like Chris Claremont and Judd Winick, lending his art to titles like Gen¹³, Zero, E.V.E. Protomecha, Batgirl and Titans/Young Justice: Graduation Day. Aside from DC, Garza has worked on Marvel Comics's Marvel Knights Spider-Man and Top Cow's Witchblade.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alé_Garza

Alé Garza in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Nestor Redondo (May 4, 1928 – September 30, 1995) was a Filipino comic book artist best known for his work for DC Comics, Marvel Comics, and other American publishers in the 1970s and early 1980s.

In the 1970s, Redondo began to do work for publishers in the United States. His earliest U.S. credit is penciling and inking the ten-page story "The King Is Dead", by writer Jack Oleck, in DC Comics' House of Mystery #194 (Sept. 1971). Through the 1970s, Redondo drew dozens of such supernatural anthology stories for DC titles including House of Secrets, The Phantom Stranger, Secrets of Sinister House, The Unexpected, Weird War Tales, and The Witching Hour. He drew six of the seven issues of Rima, the Jungle Girl (May 1974 - March 1975), based on the heroine of a Victorian novel, as well as Swamp Thing #11-23 (Aug. 1974 - July 1976), and DC's tabloid-sized one-shot collection of Bible stories. Nestor Redondo and his brother Frank Redondo often collaborated and credited together as the "Redondo Studio" most notably on the Ragman series for DC.

In the mid-1980s, Redondo inked the Eclipse Comics time-travel series Aztec Ace, by writer Doug Moench and pencilers Michael Hernandez and Dan Day. In 1990, he contributed to the second issue of the Marvel Comics superhero series Solarman as well as to an issue of Innovation Comics' Legends of the Stargrazers. Redondo collaborated with Roy Thomas on an adaptation of Robert E. Howard's Marchers of Valhalla in the mid-1990s, but the finished comic book never saw print.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestor_Redondo

Nestor Redondo in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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John Broome (May 4, 1913 – March 14, 1999) was an American comic book writer for DC Comics.

Broome created many DC characters and institutions, including the whimsical simian sleuth Detective Chimp, with artist Carmine Infantino, in The Adventures of Rex the Wonder Dog #4; the Phantom Stranger, also with Infantino, in Phantom Stranger #1; and the post-apocalyptic heroes the Atomic Knights, with artist Murphy Anderson, in Strange Adventures #117.

With the dawn of what fans and historians call the Silver Age of Comic Books, Broome was instrumental in writing stories of two key characters who helped revive the moribund archetype of the superhero. Following the creation of an all new Flash, Broome co-created several of the character's primary supervillain antagonists including Captain Boomerang, the 64th century villain Abra Kadabra, and Professor Zoom. Kid Flash and the Elongated Man were introduced as allies of the Flash.

Broome, with penciler Kane and editor-conceptualist Schwartz, created Hal Jordan, the Silver Age Green Lantern, in Showcase #22. He became the character's primary scripter in Green Lantern's solo series as well. Broome's stories for the Green Lantern series included transforming Hal Jordan's love interest, Carol Ferris, into the Star Sapphire in issue #16. Black Hand debuted in issue #29 by Broome and Kane. The creative team created Guy Gardner in issue #59.

In 1964, Schwartz was made responsible for reviving the faded Batman titles and together with Broome and Infantino jettisoned the sillier aspects that had crept into the franchise and gave the character a "New Look" that premiered in Detective Comics #327.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Broome_(writer)

John Broome in the Grand Comics Database:
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It's Star Wars Day! May the fourth be with you.

Star Wars Day is an unofficial secular holiday in May which celebrates the Star Wars franchise created by George Lucas. It is observed by fans of the movies. Observance of the holiday spread quickly due to Internet, social media, and grassroots celebrations.

May 4 is considered a holiday by Star Wars fans to celebrate the franchise's films series, books, and culture. The date was chosen for the easy pun on the catchphrase "May the Force be with you"—"May the fourth be with you".

Star Wars Day became so popular that the following day was jokingly called "Revenge of the Fifth", a play on the Star Wars movie title Revenge of the Sith. On this day, fans join the "Dark Side" by celebrating the Sith Lords and villains from the Star Wars series.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_Wars_Day

Star Wars in the Grand Comics Database:
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John Cullen Murphy (May 3, 1919 – July 2, 2004) was an American illustrator best known for his three decades of work on the Prince Valiant comic strip.

Murphy's art often depicted sports subjects. His boxing material unexpectedly led him into the comic strip field, something he had never previously considered. In 1950, writer Elliot Caplin (brother of cartoonist Al Capp) of King Features Syndicate asked Murphy to illustrate a boxing comic strip he was planning to write. Murphy accepted his invitation. The resulting daily comic strip, Big Ben Bolt, was launched in 1950 and ran until 1978. Murphy was the artist for the strip for its entire run.

Murphy began his collaboration on Prince Valiant with creator Hal Foster in 1970 when Foster decided to lessen his workload at age 78. With Foster's retirement in 1979, Murphy's son Cullen took over the writing. Cullen Murphy began contributing stories to Foster while studying at Amherst College. Murphy continued to draw Prince Valiant with his son scripting and his daughter doing the lettering and coloring. He retired in March 2004, turning the strip over to his chosen successor, illustrator Gary Gianni. Murphy died four months later in Cos Cob, Connecticut.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cullen_Murphy

John Cullen Murphy in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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Adam Hughes (born May 3, 1967) is an American comic book artist and illustrator who has worked for companies such as DC Comics, Marvel Comics, Dark Horse Comics, Lucasfilm, Warner Bros. Pictures, Playboy magazine, Joss Whedon's Mutant Enemy Productions and Sideshow Collectibles.

He is best known to American comic book readers for his renderings of pinup-style female characters, and his cover work on titles such as Wonder Woman and Catwoman.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_Hughes

Adam Hughes in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Boleslav William Felix Robert "Bill" Sienkiewicz (pronounced sin-KEV-itch) (born May 3, 1958) is an Eisner Award-winning American artist and writer best known for his comic book work, primarily for Marvel Comics' The New Mutants and Elektra: Assassin. Sienkiewicz often utilizes oil painting, collage, mimeograph and other forms generally uncommon in comic books.

After art school, he showed a portfolio of his work to DC Comics' art director Vince Colletta, which led to his breaking into the field at age 19. The artist recalled in 1985, "They didn't have any work for me, but that didn't bother me. I just figured that if comics didn't work out I'd have done advertising or illustration. Vinnie called [renowned comics and advertising artist] Neal Adams, who put me in touch with [Marvel Comics editor-in-chief] Jim Shooter. Soon after that I was drawing Moon Knight, in The Hulk [black-and-white comics] magazine". His art style was heavily influenced by Neal Adams.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Sienkiewicz

Bill Sienkiewicz in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Disclaimer
The Grand Comics Database Project (GCD) is a volunteer project with the goal of documenting and indexing all comics for the free use of scholars, historians, researchers, and fans.
The GCD acknowledges that the all-encompassing research nature of the project may result in the posting of cover scans for comics with images that some may find objectionable.
Viewer discretion is advised.
The Grand Comics Database Team
Last Updated Issues
Statistics
8,310 publishers
5,581 brands
4,388 indicia publishers
84,839 series
1,084,991 issues
42,384 variant issues
217,936 issue indexes
528,063 covers
1,450,476 stories