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1,000,000 issues!

On Monday, August 25th, Mexican indexer Ruben Cortes added the monumental one millionth issue to the database. It is the second issue of John Constantine Hellblazer from publisher Editorial Televisa. As we have two hundred thousand issues indexed, there is still plenty for us to do!

The next milestone? The soon to be reached 500,000th cover scan!


New Search Technology!

Our new search technology is now the default search option in the search box, while all others are still supported. This search behaves similar to a google or bing search, it searches the content of most of our data and allows easy combination of different search terms in the different data fields. By adding other relevant search terms one can then easily filter down the results. Also sorting by several criteria is possible.

The easiest way to find a specific issue should now be the third option 'Series Name & Issue #', where you enter the series name followed by the issue number, e.g. X-Men 12.

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GCD Comics Timeline


Eric James Shanower (born October 23, 1963) is an American comics artist and writer, best known for his Oz novels and comics and the on-going retelling of the Trojan War as Age of Bronze.

Upon his graduation from Novato High School in 1981, he attended The Kubert School[1][2][3] in Dover, New Jersey,[4] graduating in 1984.

Shanower's first major published works were the Oz graphic novels, which are The Enchanted Apples of Oz, The Secret Island of Oz, The Ice King of Oz, The Forgotten Forest of Oz, and The Blue Witch of Oz released by First Comics and Dark Horse Comics between 1986 and 1992.[2] They are collected in a single large volume titled Adventures in Oz, published by IDW. He is currently writing adaptations of L. Frank Baum's original Oz novels for the Marvel Comics imprint Marvel Illustrated, illustrated by artist Skottie Young.

He is currently writing the comic series, Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland for IDW. The first issue was released August 20, 2014.

In February 1991, Shanower "conceived the idea to tell the story of the Trojan War in the comics medium," aiming to combine "the myriad versions of the Greek myth with the archaeological record" to showcase the tale in "authentic historical detail."[5] This aim has been manifested in the ongoing comic book Age of Bronze, debuting in late 1998 from Image Comics. As of 2013, the series has been collected in four (of a projected seven) volumes.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Shanower

Eric Shanower in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Terry and the Pirates was an action-adventure comic strip created by cartoonist Milton Caniff. Captain Joseph Patterson, editor for the Chicago Tribune New York News Syndicate, had admired Caniff's work on the children's adventure strip Dickie Dare and hired him to create the new adventure strip, providing Caniff with the title and locale. The Dragon Lady leads the evil pirates; conflict with the pirates was diminished in priority when World War II started.

The daily strip began October 22, 1934, and the Sunday color pages began December 9, 1934. Initially, the storylines of the daily strips and Sunday pages were different, but on August 26, 1936 they merged into a single storyline. In 1946, Caniff won the first Cartoonist of the Year Award from the National Cartoonists Society for his work on Terry and the Pirates.

The strip was read by 31 million newspaper subscribers between 1934 and 1946.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terry_and_the_Pirates_%28comic_strip%29

Terry and the Pirates in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Olivier Coipel is a French comic book artist, known for his work on books such as House of M, Legion of Super-Heroes and Thor.

Coipel came to prominence and significant controversy as the artist of the American DC Comics book Legion of Super-Heroes during the tenure of writers Dan Abnett and Andy Lanning., beginning with the Legion Lost story arc. Despite complaints about his art style by long-time Legion of Super-Heroes fans - who felt his style was "too rough and unrefined", leading to more than one prominent critic to refer to him as "Ol' Scratchy" - Coipel continued to draw the series when it was relaunched under the new title The Legion.

Coipel signed an exclusive contract with Marvel Comics in January 2005. He was named in August 2005 as one of Marvel's "Young Guns," a group of artists that that included Jim Cheung, David Finch, Trevor Hairsine, Adi Granov, and Steve McNiven, which according to Marvel Editor-in-Chief Joe Quesada, exhibited the qualities that make "a future superstar penciller."

One of Coipel's first major works at Marvel was House of M, an eight issue New Avengers/X-Men crossover limited series with writer Brian Michael Bendis. Coipel was then announced as artist on a new Thor ongoing series that launched in July 2007 with writer J. Michael Straczynski. Coipel re-teamed with Bendis for the four-issue 2009 Marvel Comics event series Siege. In 2010, he provided art for a Magneto-focused backup story leading into the Young Avengers miniseries Avengers: the Children's Crusade, before returning to Thor in 2011, illustrating the first arc on Matt Fraction's The Mighty Thor.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olivier_Coipel

Olivier Copiel in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Steven Grant (born October 22, 1953) is an American comic-book writer best known for his 1985-1986 Marvel Comics mini-series Punisher, with artist Mike Zeck and for his creator-owned character Whisper.

Grant has a long history scripting for both major publishers such as Marvel Comics and DC, as well as smaller companies such as First Comics and Dark Horse.

Beginning in the early 1980s Grant wrote a number of works for Marvel. In addition to bringing the Punisher back into the forefront of the Marvel Universe after a several-year lull, Grant has written Avengers, The Hulk, and fill-in runs on comics such as What If?, Spectacular Spider-Man, and Marvel Team-Up.

Grant's creator-owned character, the female ninja Whisper, debuted at Capital Comics in 1983 and later by First Comics.

At Dark Horse Comics, Grant wrote several limited and ongoing series in the short-lived Dark Horse shared superhero continuity, including the entire two-year run of the series X. He wrote numerous stories for DC Comics in the 1990s and created new versions of Manhunter and Challengers Of The Unknown. His last major contribution for Marvel was X-Man in collaboration with Warren Ellis and Ariel Olivetti.

His two long-running columns exposing the inner workings of the comics industry, "Master Of The Obvious" and "Permanent Damage", ran from 1999-2010 at the Comic Book Resources website.

Since 2005, Grant has written several works for IDW Publishing including original comics featuring the characters from the television show CSI. He wrote a one-shot featuring an updated version of his character Whisper and created a crime series, 2 Guns, about undercover cops, for Boom! Studios.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steven_Grant

Steven Grant in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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Tom Morgan (born October 21) is an American comic book artist known primarily for his work on Marvel Comics' Captain America, The Punisher 2099, Excalibur and Iron Man.

Morgan broke into the industry in the early 1980s and worked on a large number of Marvel titles, mostly as a fill-in artist, for such books as Captain America, Star Brand, West Coast Avengers, Star Trek, and Power Pack. In the mid-1990s, he worked on Punisher 2099 and Iron Man for Marvel; and Extreme Justice and both the Action Comics and The Adventures of Superman titles for DC Comics.

Morgan drew the comic book version of Barack Obama's biography, released in the fall of 2008 by IDW Publishing.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Morgan_%28comics%29

Tom Morgan in the Grand Comics Database:
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Michael Dooney is an American comic book writer and artist and toy designer best known for his works on the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles series. Dooney also created the comic book series Gizmo in 1986 under Mirage Studios.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Dooney

Michael Dooney in the Grand Comics Database:
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Ralph "Rags" Morales is an American comic book artist known for his work on various books for DC Comics, including Identity Crisis, Countdown to Infinite Crisis, Batman Confidential, and The New 52 reboot of then Superman-centric Action Comics.

Morales' first professional work was penciling 19 issues of Forgotten Realms as part of the TSR line of books. Following Forgotten Realms, Morales co-created and pencilled Black Condor.

Morales left DC Comics to do work for Valiant Comics, including Turok, Archer & Armstrong and Geomancer. After Valiant closed, Morales returned to his TSR roots, doing work for Dungeons and Dragons magazines.

In 1999, Morales was made the penciler on DC's on Hourman, penciling 20 of that series 25 issues. Over the course of the following year, he drew nine issues of JSA before moving onto Hawkman with writer Geoff Johns.

After Hawkman, Morales illustrated Brad Meltzer's limited series Identity Crisis. The series was eventually selected by The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA)'s 2007 recommended list of Great Graphic Novels For Teens.

Morales worked on Nightwing during Peter Tomasi's run as writer on that title. He later worked on Superman/Batman #53 - 56, which were among the seven issues collected in to the Finest Worlds hardcover in 2009, and in trade paperback form in 2010.

In 2009 he contributed to the "Blackest Night" storyline with the three issues miniseries, Blackest Night: Tales of the Corps.

In June 2011, as part of DC Comics' massive relaunch of their entire superhero line, Morales was announced as the artist on the new Action Comics #1, teaming with writer Grant Morrison.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rags_Morales

Rags Morales in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Lee Weeks is an American comic book artist, known for his work on such books as Daredevil.

Weeks made his professional comics debut in the 1980s, penciling, inking, and lettering a short story ("Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk") in Tales of Terror #5, a horror anthology published by Eclipse Comics. He is best known for his work for Marvel Comics on Daredevil Vol. 1 series (1990–1992), where he pencilled the Last Rites storyline. It featured the fall of the Kingpin and is a sequel of sorts to Frank Miller and David Mazzucchelli's Born Again.

Other titles he has contributed to include Justice (1988–1989), The Destroyer Vol.1 (1989–1990), Gambit Vol.1 (1993–1994), Tarzan vs. Predator (Dark Horse Comics), Spider-Man: Death and Destiny (2000), Spider-Man: The Mysterio Manifesto (2001), Spider-Man's Tangled Web (2002), Captain America Vol. 4 #17-20 (with writer Dave Gibbons) (Marvel Comics, 2003) and The Incredible Hulk Vol. 3 (2002, 2005). Weeks penciled the five-part Captain Marvel (Marvel Comics) (2007–2008) mini-series for Marvel Comics.

In a brief period with DC Comics, Weeks penciled the 1997 48-page bookshelf format book, Batman Chronicles: Gauntlet, which was written by Bruce Canwell. He also worked as a storyboard artist for Superman: The Animated Series.

Weeks is the subject of the seventeenth volume of the Modern Masters series published by TwoMorrows Publishing in 2008.

Weeks is the writer and artist of "Angels Unaware", the opening three issues storyline of the eight-issue, Marvel anthology miniseries Daredevil: Dark Nights.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Weeks

Lee Weeks in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Paul Levitz (born October 21, 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. The president of DC Comics from 2002–2009, he has worked for the company for over 35 years in a wide variety of roles. Along with publisher Jenette Kahn and managing editor Dick Giordano, Levitz was responsible for hiring such writers as Marv Wolfman and Alan Moore, artists such as George Pérez, Keith Giffen, and John Byrne, and editor Karen Berger, who contributed to the 1980s revitalization of the company's line of comic book heroes.

During the course of his research for the fanzine, Levitz became well known at the offices of DC Comics, where in December 1972, editor Joe Orlando gave him his first freelance work, initially writing text pages and letter pages, and later working as a per diem assistant editor before writing stories.

After serving as Joe Orlando's assistant editor, in 1976 Levitz fulfilled a lifelong dream by becoming the editor of Adventure Comics on the eve of his 20th birthday.

As a writer, Levitz is best known for his work on the title The Legion of Super-Heroes, which he wrote from 1977–1979 and 1981–1989.

With artist Steve Ditko, Levitz co-created the characters Stalker and the Prince Gavyn version of Starman.

Levitz eventually became an editor, and served as vice president and executive vice president, before assuming the role of President in 2002.

On September 9, 2009, it was announced that Levitz would step down as President and Publisher of DC Comics to serve as the Contributing Editor and Overall Consultant for the newly formed DC Entertainment, and become the writer of both Adventure Comics and Legion of Super-Heroes.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Levitz

Paul Levitz in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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Geofrey "Geof" Darrow (born October 21, 1955) is an American comic book artist, best known for his work on Hard Boiled; The Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot, which was adapted into an animated television series of the same name, and Shaolin Cowboy.

In 1982, he met French comic book writer and artist Moebius who was working on the film Tron. Two years later, the two collaborated on a portfolio of prints named La Cité Feu, later reprinted for the English-speaking market as City of Fire.

Moebius introduced Darrow to Frank Miller which led to a friendship and eventually two collaborations. In 1990, Darrow and Miller collaborated on the comic book Hard Boiled, a 3-part mini-series, for which they won the 1991 Eisner Award for Best Writer/Artist.

Darrow and Miller worked together again on Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot in 1996, a far more family-oriented work, in which the protagonists save Tokyo from destruction by a giant lizard.

The Wachowskis saw his work on Hard Boiled, and approached Darrow to do some conceptual work for The Matrix. Darrow was credited as 'Conceptual Designer' on all three Matrix movies.

Darrow started writing and illustrating Shaolin Cowboy in 2005 (published by Burlyman Entertainment), featuring Darrow's trademark ultra-violence, irony and meticulous level of detail. As of May 2007, seven volumes had been released.

Darrow is also the co-creator of the series Doc Frankenstein, written by the Wachowskis, with art by Steve Skroce, also published by Burlyman Entertainment.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geof_Darrow

Geof Darrow in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Cover Image

475,000 covers uploaded!

The 475,000th cover was uploaded recently to the GCD!

Check out the cover which is from Una Criada Estupenda #15 (Editorial Novaro, 1968 Series), a series from Mexico.

Take a look at our international statistics to see what else the GCD's been up to.

New GCD Logo

We have a new logo to help mark our 20th Anniversary! It is our first major design change since 1999 and will be seen on our t-shirts and convention gear throughout the year. We would like to thank Brian Saner Lamken for submitting his winning design and HippieBoy Design for applying those finishing touches. We hope you like it as much as we do!

1 million English stories

While our international content is steadily growing, we reached for English language stories an even big number: 1 million story sequences!

100,000 Norwegian stories

Norwegian is the second language to reach 100,000 stories!

Take a look at our international statistics to see what else the GCD's been up to.

How to help ?

There are several ways in which you can help us to improve our site and its content.
  • You can provide missing data, update existing data, or upload cover scans. Just register an account with us, and you can start contributing.
  • Donate for our ongoing costs, e.g. the server infrastructure. We are a non-profit organization and any funds will be used for our goal of documenting and indexing all comics.
  • We need volunteer web designers and programmers! Please contact the gcd-tech group or visit our technical documentation if you can help with any of these roles:
    • Web designer / front-end developer (HTML / CSS / JavaScript)
    • Python / Django programming
    • Elasticsearch search server together with Haystack
    • Web Services API
    • Database Performance (MySQL)
Disclaimer
The Grand Comics Database Project (GCD) is a volunteer project with the goal of documenting and indexing all comics for the free use of scholars, historians, researchers, and fans.
The GCD acknowledges that the all-encompassing research nature of the project may result in the posting of cover scans for comics with images that some may find objectionable.
Viewer discretion is advised.
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Comics Calendar
Statistics
7,849 publishers
5,233 brands
4,101 indicia publishers
80,184 series
1,014,863 issues
37,869 variant issues
205,195 issue indexes
498,911 covers
1,363,925 stories