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50,000 German covers uploaded!


The 50,000th cover of a German language cover was uploaded in January to the GCD!

Check out the cover which is from the issue Lasso #573.


New Search Technology!

Our new search technology is now the default search option in the search box, while all others are still supported. This search behaves similar to a google or bing search, it searches the content of most of our data and allows easy combination of different search terms in the different data fields. By adding other relevant search terms one can then easily filter down the results. Also sorting by several criteria is possible.

The easiest way to find a specific issue should now be the third option 'Series Name & Issue #', where you enter the series name followed by the issue number, e.g. X-Men 12.

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GCD Comics Timeline


Diana Schutz (born 1955) is a comic book editor, most notable as editor in chief of Comico during its peak years and for her continuing tenure at Dark Horse Comics, for whom she has worked since 1990. "She is Frank Miller's editor on Sin City and 300, Matt Wagner's editor on Grendel, Stan Sakai's editor on Usagi Yojimbo, and Paul Chadwick's editor on Concrete", and known to her letter-column readers as "Auntie Dydie".

She is also an adjunct instructor of comics history and criticism at Portland Community College.

Diana Schutz was born on 1 February 1955 in Canada, Schutz read comics as a child. By her early teens, she began drifting towards romance titles, and then away from comics altogether until college, where she studied Philosophy and Creative Writing. Finding comics including Steve Gerber's Howard the Duck a welcome diversion from - if ultimately not a polar opposite to Plato, Bertrand Russell and Immanuel Kant, she found herself pulled back into the world of comics. Frequenting the comic shop called "The ComicShop" (owned by Ken Witcher and Ron Norton) in Vancouver, British Columbia, she ultimately dropped out of graduate school to move in 1978 from being one of the ComicShop's few female customers to being one of its few "counterpeople", where she says she found herself "learn[ing] social skills I never learned in the ivory tower of academia."

Witcher, Norton and The ComicShop swiftly proved able sources for Schutz to discover comics, including "Barry Windsor-Smith's Conan; Jim Starlin's Captain Marvel; Craig Russell's Killraven; and Dave Sim's Cerebus, of which she was "one of the first 2,000 readers to actually buy issue 1.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_Schutz

Diana Schutz in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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Charles William "Bill" Mumy, Jr. (/ˈmuːmi/; born February 1, 1954), is an American actor, musician, pitchman, instrumentalist, voice-over artist, and a figure in the science-fiction community. He is most famous for his many appearances on TV as a child actor in the 1960s.

The red-headed Mumy came to prominence in the 1960s as a child actor, when he was credited as Billy Mumy. His most notable role was in the 1960s CBS sci-fi television series Lost in Space, where he played Will Robinson, the youngest of three children in the Robinson family.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Mumy

Bill Mumy in the Grand Comics Database:
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Pearl Zane Grey (January 31, 1872 – October 23, 1939) was an American author best known for his popular adventure novels and stories that were a basis for the Western genre in literature and the arts; he idealized the American frontier. Riders of the Purple Sage (1912) was his best-selling book. In addition to the commercial success of his printed works, they had second lives and continuing influence when adapted as films and television productions. As of 2012, 112 films, two television episodes, and a television series, Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater, had been made that were based loosely on Grey's novels and short stories.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zane_Grey

Zane Grey in the Grand Comics Database:
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Marsupilami is a fictional comic book species created by André Franquin, first published on 31 January 1952 in the Franco-Belgian comics magazine Spirou. Since then it appeared regularly in the popular Belgian comic book series Spirou et Fantasio until Franquin stopped working on the series in 1968 and the character dropped out soon afterward. In the late 1980s, the Marsupilami got its own successful spin-off series of comic albums, Marsupilami, written by Greg, Yann and Dugomier and drawn by Batem, launching the publishing house Marsu Productions. Later, two animated shows featuring this character, as well as a Sega Genesis video game and a variety of other merchandise followed. The asteroid 98494 Marsupilami is named in its honour.

The name is a portmanteau of the words marsupial, Pilou-Pilou (the French name for Eugene the Jeep, a character Franquin loved as a kid) and ami, French for friend.

Marsupilami's adventures had been translated to several languages, like Dutch, German, Greek, Spanish, Portuguese and several Scandinavian languages. More than three million albums of the Marsupilami series are claimed to have been sold by Marsu Productions.

One album of Spirou and Fantasio featuring Marsupilami, number 15, was translated to English by Fantasy Flight Publishing in 1995, although it is currently out of print. Plans on releasing number 16 ended halfway through the translation process, due to bad sales. In 2007, Egmont's subsidiary Euro Books translated albums number 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 14 for the Indian market.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marsupilami

Marsupilami in the Grand Comics Database:
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Grant Morrison, MBE (born 31 January 1960) is a Scottish comic book writer, playwright and occultist. He is known for his nonlinear narratives and countercultural leanings in his runs on titles including DC Comics' Animal Man, Batman, JLA, The Invisibles, Action Comics, All-Star Superman, and Doom Patrol, and Marvel Comics' New X-Men and Fantastic Four.

Grant Morrison was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1960. His first published works were Gideon Stargrave strips for Near Myths in 1978 (when he was about 17, one of the first British alternative comics. His work appeared in four of the five issues of Near Myths and he was suitably encouraged to find more comic work. This included a weekly comic strip Captain Clyde, an unemployed superhero based in Glasgow, for The Govan Press, a local newspaper, plus various issues of DC Thomson's Starblazer, a science fiction version of that company's Commando title.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grant_Morrison

Grant Morrison in the Grand Comics Database:
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Around the World in Eighty Days (French: Le tour du monde en quatre-vingts jours) is a classic adventure novel by the French writer Jules Verne, published on January 30, 1873. In the story, Phileas Fogg of London and his newly employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a £20,000 wager (roughly £1.6 million today) set by his friends at the Reform Club. It is one of Verne's most acclaimed works.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Around_the_World_in_Eighty_Days

Around the World in Eighty Days in the Grand Comics Database:
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Lucio Parrillo is an artist, known for comic books, role-playing game covers, and Magic: The Gathering cards.

Parrillo penciled the comics Vampire Girls, Coven 2 and Eternal Temptation, and also did the artwork on the series L' Empire Eternel. He has created covers for Skorpio, Lennox, and Lord of the Jungle.

His Dungeons & Dragons work includes cover art for Champions of Ruin (2005), and interior art for Sharn: City of Towers (2004), Monster Manual III (2004), Eberron Campaign Setting (2004), Champions of Valor (2005), Spell Compendium (2005), Red Hand of Doom (2006), Tome of Magic (2006), Player's Handbook II (2006), Dragon Magic (2006), Expedition to Castle Ravenloft (2006), Rules Compendium (2007), and the fourth edition Manual of the Planes (2008), Thunderspire Labyrinth (2008), Pyramid of Shadows (2008), and Martial Power (2008).

Parrillo's other print work has included the magazines Città, Color, and Lanciostory; the newspaper Il Cavatore; and stories and posters for publishing house Zero Press. He has also illustrated video games.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucio_Parrillo

Lucio Parrillo in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Fred Hembeck (born January 30, 1953) is an American cartoonist best known for his parodies of characters from major American comic book publishers. His work has frequently been published by the firms whose characters he spoofs. His characters are always drawn with curlicues at the elbows and knees. He often portrays himself as a character in his own work, in the role of "interviewer" of various comic book characters. Interviewer Daniel Best has said of his work, "If you take your comic books seriously, and think that those characters are real then you're probably not a fan of Hembeck."

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Hembeck

Fred Hembeck in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Denys B. Cowan (born January 30, 1960) is an American comic book artist and television producer.

Denys Cowan is a graduate of the High School of Art and Design in New York City. His first published comics work was a three-page story in Weird War Tales #93 (Nov. 1980) for DC Comics. He gained prominence as the primary artist on The Question, a comic book series written by Dennis O'Neil and published by DC beginning in February 1987. His other comics credits include the Batman story arc Blind Justice in Detective Comics #598-600 (March–May 1989) with writer Sam Hamm, which introduced the character Henri Ducard later revised as a character for the movie Batman Begins. Cowan was the penciller on the latter half of the 1990 Deathlok miniseries, published by Marvel Comics, which was written by Dwayne McDuffie and Gregory Wright as well as on the subsequent regular title of the same name.

In 1993, Cowan was one of the founders of Milestone Media, and later worked as a producer on the animated series Static Shock, based on the Milestone character. He has been a producer of the television series The Boondocks and executive producer of the planned animated Black Panther series. He later became senior vice president of animation for Black Entertainment Television (BET). Cowan drew the cover art of the GZA/Genius of the Wu-Tang Clan's platinum selling hip-hop album Liquid Swords.

Cowan and inker Rick Magyar were nominated for an Eisner Award as "Best Art Team" in both 1988 and 1989 for their work on The Question.

from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denys_Cowan

Denys Cowan in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Disclaimer
The Grand Comics Database Project (GCD) is a volunteer project with the goal of documenting and indexing all comics for the free use of scholars, historians, researchers, and fans.
The GCD acknowledges that the all-encompassing research nature of the project may result in the posting of cover scans for comics with images that some may find objectionable.
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Statistics
8,050 publishers
5,421 brands
4,261 indicia publishers
82,186 series
1,049,706 issues
40,287 variant issues
211,353 issue indexes
515,918 covers
1,408,970 stories