Welcome to the Grand Comics Database!

We're a nonprofit, Internet-based organization of international volunteers dedicated to building a database covering all printed comics throughout the world, and we're glad you're here! Give our search form a try, or take a look at the menu to the left to see how you can help us improve the site.


1,000,000 issues!

On Monday, August 25th, Mexican indexer Ruben Cortes added the monumental one millionth issue to the database. It is the second issue of John Constantine Hellblazer from publisher Editorial Televisa. As we have two hundred thousand issues indexed, there is still plenty for us to do!

The next milestone? The soon to be reached 500,000th cover scan!


New Search Technology!

Our new search technology is now the default search option in the search box, while all others are still supported. This search behaves similar to a google or bing search, it searches the content of most of our data and allows easy combination of different search terms in the different data fields. By adding other relevant search terms one can then easily filter down the results. Also sorting by several criteria is possible.

The easiest way to find a specific issue should now be the second option 'Series #', where you enter the series name followed by the issue number, e.g. X-Men 12.


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200,000 comics indexed!

The GCD volunteers have been hard at work continuously adding more comics to the database reaching a monumental goal of 200,000 issues indexed!

Great job to everybody who has contributed from the first indexed issue to this impressive milestone. Keep up the great work!


GCD Convention Scene

The GCD has been celebrating our 20th Anniversary with comic convention appearances. Join our volunteers at the Baltimore Comic-Con Baltimore, MD (5-7 September).
We also have members wearing their t-shirts and handing out flyers at a few more shows across the US and Europe. Check out our Facebook Events Page for a full list, and let us know which show we will see you at.


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475,000 covers uploaded!

The 475,000th cover was uploaded recently to the GCD!

Check out the cover which is from Una Criada Estupenda #15 (Editorial Novaro, 1968 Series), a series from Mexico.

Take a look at our international statistics to see what else the GCD's been up to.


GCD Comics Timeline


Gaspar Saladino (born 1926 or c. 1928) is an American letterer and logo designer who worked for over 50 years in the comic book industry, mostly for DC Comics. Eventually Saladino went by one name, "Gaspar," which he wrote in his trademark calligraphy.

From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s, Saladino did the titles, lettering, and sound effects for all DC Comics covers. For a period in the 1970s, he was also "page-one letterer" for many Marvel Comics books.

Saladino designed the logos for DC's Swamp Thing, Phantom Stranger, Metal Men, Adam Strange, House of Mystery, House of Secrets, Unknown Soldier, and Vigilante, among others. He also re-designed established character logos to make them more contemporary and stylish, such as with Green Lantern.

For Marvel, Saladino's logos, which he either created or updated, include The Avengers, Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos, Captain America and the Falcon, and Marvel Triple Action.

In 1974, with the launch of the short-lived publisher Atlas Comics, Saladino designed logos for all the company's titles. He did the same in the 1980s for Neal Adams' Continuity Comics. During that decade, Saladino also designed the logos of some titles published by Eclipse Comics and in the 1990s he designed product logos for the Lucky Mojo Curio Company, a metaphysical supply manufactory founded by Catherine Yronwode, the former editor-in-chief of Eclipse Comics.

Saladino's default dialoguing style is curvy and naturally enmeshed with the artwork. One trademark is his use of big, bold exclamation points. Saladino always letters by hand. Likewise, his word balloons are done freehand, never with a template.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaspar_Saladino

Gaspar Saladino in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Joe Jusko (born September 1, 1959 in New York) is an American artist known for his realistic, highly detailed painted fantasy, pin-up, and cover illustrations, mainly in the comic book industry. Jusko painted the 1992 Marvel Masterpieces trading cards, the popularity of which has been credited with initiating the painted trading card boom of the 1990s.

After graduating, Jusko worked as an assistant for five months for Howard Chaykin, which led to Jusko selling his first cover for Heavy Metal magazine at the age of 18. Forgoing college, Jusko went straight into the commercial illustration world.

During his career, Jusko has worked for almost every major comic book publisher, producing hundreds of images for both covers and interiors. In addition to his long stint as one of the main cover artists for The Savage Sword of Conan, Jusko has painted every major character that Marvel Comics has created, most notably the Hulk and the Punisher.

Jusko has also produced covers and interior art for many other comics companies and characters, including DC Comics, Crusade Comics, Innovation Comics, Harris Comics, Wildstorm Comics, Top Cow Productions, and Byron Preiss Visual Publications.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Jusko

Joe Jusko in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Joseph "Joe" Kelly is an American comic book writer, penciler and editor who has written such titles as Deadpool, Uncanny X-Men, Action Comics, and JLA. As part of the comics creator group Man of Action Studios, Kelly is one of the creators of the animated series Ben 10.

Kelly received his MFA at New York University's Tisch School of the Arts, where he still teaches Writing for Animation/Writing for Comics. At NYU, he was recruited into Marvel Comics' editor James Felder's Stan-hattan Project, a program that trained potential comic book writers at the university. After six months of working in the class, Felder offered Kelly a job scripting Fantastic Four 2099 over a Karl Kesel plot. Kelly took the assignment, but his first published work for Marvel was 1996's 2099: World of Tomorrow #1-8 and Marvel Fanfare vol.2 #2-3.

In 1997, Kelly began his first monthly assignment, Deadpool, initially pencilled by Ed McGuinness. The title was immediately well received by fans and critics. At one point it was due to be cancelled with #25, but a write-in and Internet campaign by fans led Marvel to reverse their decision. In 1997, Kelly also became the writer of Daredevil, on which he was accompanied by well-known Daredevil artist Gene Colan.

Kelly is a part of the Man of Action collective of creators (along with Joe Casey, Duncan Rouleau, Steven T. Seagle), who created the series Ben 10, currently airing on Cartoon Network. Around the same time Ben 10 began to air, he was also hired as a Story Editor on TMNT: Fast Forward. With Man of Action Studios, he's also a Supervising Producer on Disney/Marvel's upcoming Disney XD series, "Ultimate Spider-Man."

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Kelly_%28writer%29

Joe Kelly in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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Eugene Jules "Gene" Colan (September 1, 1926 – June 23, 2011) was an American comic book artist best known for his work for Marvel Comics, where his signature titles include the superhero series Daredevil, the cult-hit satiric series Howard the Duck, and The Tomb of Dracula, considered one of comics' classic horror series. He co-created the Falcon, the first African-American superhero in mainstream comics, and the non-costumed, supernatural vampire hunter Blade, which went on to star in a series of films starring Wesley Snipes.

Colan was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2005.

Under his own name, Colan became one of the premier Silver Age Marvel artists, illustrating a host of such major characters as Captain America, Doctor Strange (both in the late-1960s and the mid-1970s series), and his signature character, Daredevil. Operating, like other company artists, on the "Marvel Method" — in which editor-in-chief and primary writer Stan Lee "would just speak to me for a few minutes on the phone, tell me the beginning, the middle and the end of a story and not much else, maybe four or five paragraphs, and then he’d tell me to make a 20-page story out of it," providing artwork to which Lee would then script dialogue and captions — Colan forged his own style, different from that of artists Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko.

Colan in the 1970s illustrated the complete, 70-issue run of the acclaimed horror title The Tomb of Dracula as well as most issues of writer Steve Gerber's cult-hit, Howard the Duck.

He brought his shadowy, moody textures to Batman, serving as the character's primary artist from 1982 to 1986, penciling most issues of Detective Comics and Batman during this time.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_Colan

Gene Colan in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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José Ortiz Moya (September 1, 1932 – December 23, 2013) was a Spanish comics artist, best known for several collaborations with Antonio Segura, such as the series Hombre.

Ortiz joined Warren Publishing in 1974 due to his connections with the Valencia studio of Selecciones Illustrada. He would remain with Warren until 1983 and drew more stories for that company (approximately 120) than any other artist. His work included the series Apocalypse, Night of the Jackass and Coffin in Eerie, as well as Pantha in Vampirella and numerous stand alone stories. Ortiz would also draw Vampirella herself in issues 35 and 36 that title. He won the award for 'Best All Around Artist' at Warren in 1974.

Following this period in the U.S. comics industry making horror comics, he returned to Spain and formed a lasting and fertile working partnership with Antonio Segura in 1981, initiated by the serial publication of Hombre, a post-apocalyptic saga, in the magazine Cimoc.

By 1983, Ortiz and Segura joined with several other artists including Leopold Sánchez, Manfred Sommer and Jordi Bernet, to form the short-lived publishing house Metropol with the artists' interest in mind, responsible for three comics magazines, Metropol, Mocambo and KO cómics.

During the 1980s Ortiz also produced work for a number of British publications including The Tower King and The House of Daemon for Eagle and The Thirteenth Floor for Scream!. He then moved over to 2000 AD in 1984 where he contributed to a number of stories with most work on Rogue Trooper.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/José_Ortiz_%28comics%29

José Ortiz in the Grand Comics Databse:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=cover&method=i...


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Mark Evanier is reporting the passing of Stan Goldberg. http://www.newsfromme.com/2014/08/31/stan-goldberg-r-i-p/


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Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American writer, best known for his creations of the jungle hero Tarzan and the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter, although he produced works in many genres.

In a Paris Review interview, Ray Bradbury said of Burroughs that "Edgar Rice Burroughs never would have looked upon himself as a social mover and shaker with social obligations. But as it turns out — and I love to say it because it upsets everyone terribly — Burroughs is probably the most influential writer in the entire history of the world." Bradbury continued that "By giving romance and adventure to a whole generation of boys, Burroughs caused them to go out and decide to become special."

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Rice_Burroughs

Edgar Rice Burroughs in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/search/advanced/process/?target=issue_cover&me...


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50 Years Ago This Month: Kriminal #1 is published in Italy!

Kriminal is an Italian comics series featuring an eponymous fictional character, created in 1964 by Magnus and Max Bunker, the authors of Alan Ford, Maxmagnus and Satanik.

Kriminal is an English master thief, Anthony Logan, who dresses in black and yellow costume with a fearsome skull face for his adventures. The character was directly inspired by the contemporary (and more successful) Diabolik, with whom he shares the ability to use masks that allow him to assume any identity. In the earliest adventures, Kriminal was a near sadistic killer fighting for revenge against the criminals who had pushed his father to commit suicide. Having also lost his mother and sister, Logan spent his youth in a reformatory, from which he managed to escape, intent to pursue vengeance.

Kriminal has a female companion, Lola Hudson, who was once the wife of Scotland Yard Inspector Patrick Milton, his main enemy. Gradually over time, Kriminal's most extreme villainous features were toned down, and in the later stories he assumed more positive and heroic connotations.

The series was also notable as one of first to employ continuity in Italian comic books, as any new story would begin exactly at the point the previous had ended, and the characters' lives continually evolved (in contrast to Diabolik). Logan himself married and had a child, who soon died.

The series ended in November 1974 after 419 issues.

Due to the violence and the proto-erotic scenes in the comic book (as well as in Satanik), Bunker and Raviola had problems with Italian censorship. Bunker was prosecuted several times, but never condemned. The panels depicting semi-nude girls were often censored by the publisher itself.

from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kriminal

Kriminal in the Grand Comics Database:
http://www.comics.org/series/1663/covers/


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25 Years Ago This Month: Spidey faces the Scorpion in The Amazing Spider-Man #318 (http://www.comics.org/issue/46590/), script by David Michelinie with cover and interior art by Todd McFarlane!


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New GCD Logo

We have a new logo to help mark our 20th Anniversary! It is our first major design change since 1999 and will be seen on our t-shirts and convention gear throughout the year. We would like to thank Brian Saner Lamken for submitting his winning design and HippieBoy Design for applying those finishing touches. We hope you like it as much as we do!

1 million English stories

While our international content is steadily growing, we reached for English language stories an even big number: 1 million story sequences!

100,000 Norwegian stories

Norwegian is the second language to reach 100,000 stories!

Take a look at our international statistics to see what else the GCD's been up to.

How to help ?

There are several ways in which you can help us to improve our site and its content.
  • You can provide missing data, update existing data, or upload cover scans. Just register an account with us, and you can start contributing.
  • Donate for our ongoing costs, e.g. the server infrastructure. We are a non-profit organization and any funds will be used for our goal of documenting and indexing all comics.
  • We need volunteer web designers and programmers! Please contact the gcd-tech group or visit our technical documentation if you can help with any of these roles:
    • Web designer / front-end developer (HTML / CSS / JavaScript)
    • Python / Django programming
    • Elasticsearch search server together with Haystack
    • Web Services API
    • Database Performance (MySQL)
Disclaimer
The Grand Comics Database Project (GCD) is a volunteer project with the goal of documenting and indexing all comics for the free use of scholars, historians, researchers, and fans.
The GCD acknowledges that the all-encompassing research nature of the project may result in the posting of cover scans for comics with images that some may find objectionable.
Viewer discretion is advised.
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Comics Calendar
Statistics
7,749 publishers
5,146 brands
4,024 indicia publishers
78,774 series
1,002,044 issues
36,559 variant issues
202,206 issue indexes
490,757 covers
1,341,764 stories