The Grand Comics Database (GCD) is a nonprofit, internet-based organization of international volunteers dedicated to building an open database covering all printed comics throughout the world. Give our search a try, take a look at the menu to the left to see how you can help us improve the site, or use my.comics.org to track and manage your comic collection.

This year, the GCD celebrates its 25th Anniversary! Our thanks to all users and contributors for keeping us going this quarter of a century. The GCD has many ambitions for the next 25 years, and we hope you will be there to see, and perhaps contribute, to them happening.

How to Help

There are several ways in which you can help us to improve our site and its content.

  • You can provide missing data, update existing data, or upload cover scans. Just register an account with us, and you can start contributing.
  • Provide funding, either by donations, developing donation campaigns, or writing grant proposals. We are a non-profit organization and any funds will be used for our goal of documenting and indexing all comics.
  • We need volunteer web designers and programmers! Please contact the gcd-tech group or visit our technical documentation if you can help with any of these roles:
    • Python / Django programming
    • Web designer / front-end developer (HTML / CSS / JavaScript)
    • ElasticSearch search server
    • Web Services API

Two Indexing Milestones!

Cover Image Cover Image

We reached 333,333 indexed issues and 777,777 cover scans !

With the latest issue of the Marvel series Doctor Strange #13 we reached a new milestone for indexed issues. Almost on the same day, we reached 777,777 covers scans with the issue Stripoteka #326/327 published in the former Yugoslavia.

Volunteers Wanted For Adding New Comics

Each week, a small number of GCD volunteers add listings to our database for the new comics released that week in North America. These are just the basic listings, not full indexes. This makes it easier for other volunteers who upload covers and for indexers, as well as for people using my.comics.org.

Each volunteer covers one publisher or a small group of publishers (“D publishers except DC”, for example). From public sources such as ComicsList and Diamond Previews online, they add the issues and make note of the prices and a few other details. We are looking for additional volunteers for this weekly task.

Follow this link for a description of the process and a list of which publishers are currently covered.

GCD Comics Timeline


Jan Steeman (23 May 1933 – 24 January 2018, The Netherlands) was a cartoonist. He won the 2005 Stripschapprijs, the award presented annually by Stripschap, the Dutch organization of comics fans.

At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Steeman
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/yb9yz8em

Cover from Eppo #2/1976

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Raymond Leblanc (22 May 1915 – 21 March 2008, Belgium) was a comics publisher and editor and a film producer.

He and his partners founded Le Lombard publishing, “Tintin” magazine, PubliArt advertising agency, and Belvision Studios.

He is well-known for publishing “The Adventures of Tintin” by Hergé and “Blake and Mortimer” by Edgar P. Jacobs.

Leblanc received the Alph-Art d’Honneur at Angoulême in 2003 for his lifetime contribution to comics.

At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_Leblanc
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/y9a9wnck
Le Lombard in the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/y83kvdw8
In the IMDb — https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0495749/

Cover from Kuifje #29/1973

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Georges Prosper Remi (22 May 1907 – 3 March 1983), known by the pen name Hergé, was a Belgian comics writer and artist. His best known and most substantial work is the 23 completed comic books in The Adventures of Tintin series, which he wrote and illustrated from 1929 until his death in 1983, although he was also responsible for other well-known comic book series such as Quick & Flupke (1930–1940) and Jo, Zette and Jocko (1936–1957).

Born into a middle-class family in Etterbeek, Brussels, he took a keen interest in Scouting in early life, something that would prove highly influential on his later work. Initially producing illustrations for Belgian Scouting magazines, in 1927 he began working for the conservative newspaper Le XXe Siècle, where he adopted the pen name "Hergé" [ɛʁʒe], based upon the French pronunciation of "RG", his initials reversed. It was here, in 1929, that he began serialising the first of the Adventures of Tintin, Tintin in the Land of the Soviets.

The notable qualities of the Tintin stories include their vivid humanism, a realistic feel produced by meticulous and wide ranging research, and Hergé's ligne claire drawing style. Adult readers enjoy the many satirical references to the history and politics of the 20th century. The Blue Lotus, for example, was inspired by the Mukden incident that resulted in the Japanese invasion of Manchuria. King Ottokar's Sceptre could be read against the background of Hitler's Anschluss or in the context of the struggle between the Romanian Iron Guard and the King of Romania, Carol II; whilst later albums such as The Calculus Affair depict the Cold War. Hergé has become one of the most famous Belgians worldwide and Tintin is still an international success.

Hergé is a prominent national hero in his native country, to the extent where he has been described as the actual "personification of Belgium". The long-awaited Hergé Museum was opened in Louvain-La-Neuve on 2 June 2009. Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Christian de Portzamparc, the museum reflects Hergé's huge corpus of work which has, until now, been sitting in studios and bank vaults. His work remains a strong influence on comics, particularly in Europe. He was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2003.

At Comiclopedia — https://www.lambiek.net/artists/h/herge.htm
At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herg%C3%A9
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/ycbut96z

Cover from Le journal de Tintin #30/1953

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George Baker (22 May 1915 – 7 May 1975, USA) was a cartoonist from the earliest days of the USA industry.

He worked as an animator for Walt Disney in the late 1930s. Drafted for World War II, he worked on animation for training films.

He also created ‘The Sad Sack’, a pantomime comic for “Yank, the Army Weekly”. After the war, he continued the strip in general syndication and in comic books.

There was a ‘Sad Sack’ radio program (1946) and the Jerry Lewis film of the same name (1957) was based on the strip.

While others wrote the scripts, Baker drew ‘Sad Sack’ until his death.

At Comiclopedia — https://www.lambiek.net/artists/b/baker_g.htm
At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Baker_(cartoonist)
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/y99q84rw

Cover from Comic Hits #3

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Craig Shutt (born 22 May 1954, USA) is a comics editor and commentator.

He is known for his column ‘Ask Mr. Silver Age’ in the “Comics Buyer’s Guide”, which appeared from 1993 to the final issue of the magazine in 2013. Some of the columns were collected in “Baby Boomer Comics” (Krause, 2003).

He has also written for “Wizard”, “Comic Book Marketplace”, “Hogan’s Alley”, and other magazines.

At Wikipedia — http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Shutt
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/ya67awzw

Cover from Dr. Wonder #3

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Arthur Conan Doyle (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930, UK) was a physician who is best remembered for his writing, most prominently the stories of the detective Sherlock Holmes.

He also wrote science fiction stories, stage plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, and historical novels.

His works and characters have frequently been adapted to other media, including comics.

At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Conan_Doyle
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/ybonbfyu

Cover from Classic Comics #33 - Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

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Mark Crilley (21 May 1966, USA) creates comic books and children’s books.

His famous character ‘Akiko’ came to life while he was teaching in Taiwan and Japan in the early 1990s. The comics series “Akiko” (Sirius Entertainment, 1995–2004) was nominated for 13 Eisner Awards during its run. There have also been a series of “Akiko” novels.

His other works include “Miki Falls” (HarperTeen, 2007), a four-volume manga.

At Comiclopedia — https://www.lambiek.net/artists/c/crilley_mark.htm
At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Crilley
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/y9fx4j4w

Cover from Akiko #21

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Lee Elias (21 May 1920 – 8 April 1998, UK; USA) was a comics artist who worked in comic books and in syndicated strips.

His family emigrated to the USA when he was young. He studied music and art at the Cooper Union and the Art Students League and began publishing in comics books in the early 1940s.

He appeared in Fiction House comics from 1943 to 1946. He drew “Black Cat” (Harvey) from her second issue in 1946 through the early 1950s. His striking art style on the stuntwoman-turned-crimefighter was influenced by Milt Caniff (whom he had once assisted) and Noel Sickles.

During this time, he also drew ‘The Flash’ (Jay Garrick) in “All-Flash” and “Flash Comics” (DC, 1947–1948).

He created the brilliant science-fiction newspaper strip ‘Beyond Mars’ with writer Jack Williamson (1952–1955).

He returned to DC to draw ‘Green Arrow’ (1959–1964), ‘Cave Carson’ (1964), ‘Adam Strange’ (1964–1965), and stories in the science fiction, mystery, and romance anthology comics.

He and Bob Haney co-created ‘Eclipso’ in “House of Secrets” (1963) — Alex Toth became the artist with the third story.

In the late 1970s, he drew “Power Man” (1977–1979) and other comics at Marvel. His last major project was “The Rook Magazine” (Warren, 1979–1982).

At Comiclopedia — https://www.lambiek.net/artists/e/elias_lee.htm
At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Elias
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/y9v85cuk

Cover from Chamber of Chills Magazine #6

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Frank Bellamy (21 May 1917 – 5 July 1976, UK) was a comics artist whose career began in the late 1940s.

He began publishing in “Eagle” in 1959, where he would co-create features such as ‘Fraser of Africa’ (1960–1961) and ‘Heros the Spartan’ (1962–1965).

He drew ‘Thunderbirds’ in “TV Century 21” / “TV21” (1966–1968) and he drew the newspaper strip ‘Garth’ in the “Daily Mirror” from 1971 until his death in 1976.

At Comiclopedia — https://www.lambiek.net/artists/b/bellamy_frank.htm
At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Bellamy
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/y7b58j4t

Cover from TV Century 21 #57

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Don Trachte (21 May 1915 – 4 May 2005, USA) was a comics creator known for producing the syndicated strip ‘Henry’ for half a century.

He became an assistant to veteran comics creator Carl Anderson in 1932, which is when Anderson created ‘Henry’.

Anderson retired in 1942 and Trachte took over creating the Sunday strip, which he continued to do until 1993. (The daily strip was taken over by another longtime assistant, John Liney.)

At Comiclopedia — https://www.lambiek.net/artists/t/trachte_don.htm
At Wikipedia — https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Trachte
In the GCD — https://tinyurl.com/y7lhku7d

Cover from Family Funnies #6

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How to Help

There are several ways in which you can help us to improve our site and its content.

  • You can provide missing data, update existing data, or upload cover scans. Just register an account with us, and you can start contributing.
  • Donate for our ongoing costs, e.g. the server infrastructure. We are a non-profit organization and any funds will be used for our goal of documenting and indexing all comics.
  • We need volunteer web designers and programmers! Please contact the gcd-tech group or visit our technical documentation if you can help with any of these roles:
    • Web designer / front-end developer (HTML / CSS / JavaScript)
    • Python / Django programming
    • ElasticSearch search server
    • Web Services API
    • Database Performance (MySQL)
Disclaimer
The Grand Comics Database Project (GCD) is a volunteer project with the goal of documenting and indexing all comics for the free use of scholars, historians, researchers, and fans.
The GCD acknowledges that the all-encompassing research nature of the project may result in the posting of cover scans for comics with images that some may find objectionable.
Viewer discretion is advised.
The Grand Comics Database Team
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Comics Calendar
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Statistics
12,652 publishers
22,876 creators
139,540 series
1,578,179 issues
107,237 variant issues
334,474 issue indexes
782,532 covers
2,595,164 stories